When an octopus mates, its penis swims away from its body toward the female

When an octopus mates, its penis swims away from its body toward the female

The next time you see the octopus’s tentacles, remember to look closely, because what you see may not be its arm, but its penis. Although this tentacles are not real penis, like the human penis, this sexual organ is also full of blood and can erect. Regardless of which population of octopus, the basic mating process is the same. The male octopus places the seminal vesicle on the tentacles and then uses the tentacles to deliver the seminal vesicles into the female body. Male octopuses in all populations will leave “sexual tentacles” in the female body. Because they cannot grow new “sexual tentacles”, they will die in just a few months.


The mating process of some octopus populations is even more bizarre. The penis of the male paper Nautilus octopus can be separated from the body and swim to the female. Male cloak octopus is about one-four thousandth of a female. They swim to selected females, then attach the penis to the female, and finally swim away, and soon die. The female is barely aware of the whole process. The male’s penis moves all the way to the opening of the female crotch, waiting for its eggs to mature. At this point, it removes the penis, tears the seminal vesicle, and allows the semen to bind to its egg. At this time, its husband may not be in this world.

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