Music trivia:Why do you turn notes into music in a certain order?

Jesse Berezovsky, an experienced scientific researcher and amateur viola player and associate professor of physics at Case Western…

Jesse Berezovsky, an experienced scientific researcher and amateur viola player and associate professor of physics at Case Western Reserve University, has naturally understood the intrinsic relationship between the two phenomena – more specifically, how the orderly structure of music is The mixed sound is highlighted.


Music trivia:Why do you turn notes into music in a certain order?
Music trivia:Why do you turn notes into music in a certain order?

“Why can we organize sound into music according to established rules? Why do we use this method to create music? To explain this problem, we can borrow related methods: how the atoms in a random gas or liquid combine to form a specific crystal. ?”

Phase transitions in physics and music

He said that physics and music share an answer. Berezovsky believes that it is a process called “phase change”, and the balance between order and disorder (or entropy) produces a meaningful (meaningful) form.

“We can see the balance or competition of sound between uncoordination and entropy – and see that phase shifting can also develop an orderly musical structure from disordered sounds.”

The practice of combining mathematics and music is not new. For a long time, mathematicians have been fascinated by the structure of music.

But Berezovsky believes that so far, most of the ideas have been a top-down approach, applying mathematical ideas to existing musical works as a way to understand existing music.

He believes that he is revealing the “emerging structure of musical harmony” inherent in art, just as order comes from the disorder of the material world. He believes that this may mean that music in the past, present and future should be viewed in a completely new way.

“I believe this model can reveal a harmonious structure, especially in Western music,” Berezovsky said. “But we can go one step further: these ideas can provide a new perspective for studying the entire culture and the system of adjustment and harmony across history. – It may even be a new roadmap to explore these areas. Or for us, maybe just another way to appreciate music – music appears like snow or crystal gems.”

New structure in music

Berezovsky said his theory is more than just an aesthetic perspective on music. On the contrary, he said that the mathematical structure is actually the foundation of the music itself, so the octave and other music theory are inherent attributes, not human arbitrary rules.

His paper, published in Science Advances on May 17, “is intended to explain why basic ordered patterns appear in music, using the same statistical mechanics framework to describe the phase change order in physical systems.”

In other words, the same general principle of directing the arrangement of atoms from a gas or liquid into a crystal contributes to the fact that “in this model, a phase change from a disordered sound to a discrete set of pitches leads to Western music. There are octaves and twelve laws.”

The theory also explains why humans like music because it reveals a tension between too uncoordinated and overly complex.

A single note played continuously has no discord (low “energy”), but is completely boring to the human ear, while an overly complex piece of music (high entropy) is usually not satisfactory. Berezovsky said that most music – across time and culture – exists in tensions between the two extremes.

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