DETROIT WAS CAPTURED BY THE BRITISH DURING THE WAR OF 1812—AND REMAINED CAPTURED FOR OVER A YEAR.

Detroit was a rising frontier town with a population of around 800 when the War of 1812 began. Inside, there…

DETROIT WAS CAPTURED BY THE BRITISH DURING THE WAR OF 1812—AND REMAINED CAPTURED FOR OVER A YEAR.
DETROIT WAS CAPTURED BY THE BRITISH DURING THE WAR OF 1812—AND REMAINED CAPTURED FOR OVER A YEAR.

Detroit was a rising frontier town with a population of around 800 when the War of 1812 began. Inside, there was a thick-walled fortress where General William Hull—Michigan’s territorial governor—set up a base of operations with his son, his daughter, his grandchild, and a force of over 2000 American militiamen and regular army soldiers. On August 16, 1812, Hull surrendered to a numerically inferior contingent of British and Native American men who had surrounded Fort Detroit. The general had been worried about losing his supply lines and falsely believed that he was outnumbered. Plus, Tecumseh flat-out terrified him. “[Hull] had an inordinate fear of the Indians,” historian A.J. Langguth explained in the PBS documentary The War of 1812. “He was convinced that … if they were unleashed on his family or his troops, it would be the worst kind of massacre.”


Fort Detroit wasn’t retaken by the Americans until September 1813. The following year, Hull was court-martialed and found guilty of cowardice, neglect of duty, and conduct unbecoming of an officer. For these crimes, Hull received a death sentence but was then pardoned by President Madison.


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