Plant trivia:Why does mimosa close with touch?

For many people, plants are unaware. However, gently touch the leaves of the mimosa, it will be as…

For many people, plants are unaware. However, gently touch the leaves of the mimosa, it will be as shy as possible, put the leaves together and hang down. Mimosa really moves! This is a wonderful thing. It touches lightly, it moves slowly, the range of folding is small, the touch is heavy, it moves fast, and in less than 10 seconds, all the leaves will fold up.


Why does mimosa move? It turns out that it depends on the “swelling effect” of its leaves. At the base of the mimetic petiole, there is a thin-walled cell tissue filled with water, the leaf pillow, which touches the mimosa, the leaves vibrate, and the water in the cells below the leaf pillow immediately flows up and to the sides. Then, the lower part of the leaf pillow squats like a leaking bicycle tire, and the upper part is like a ball that is full of gas, and the petiole sags and closes. While the leaves of the mimosa are stimulated and closed, a bioelectricity is generated, and the stimulated information is transmitted to the other leaves, and the other leaves are sequentially closed. When the stimulus disappears, the leaf pillow is gradually filled with water, and the leaves are reopened and restored.

Plant trivia:Why does mimosa close with touch?
Plant trivia:Why does mimosa close with touch?

Not only mimosa, but also spiders act by swell. The spider’s legs are not muscles, but a liquid. By flexibly adjusting the pressure of the liquid, the spider’s 8 legs move forward and backward.

The swelling principle of mimosa and spider legs has given scientists and engineers great inspiration. They use the “swelling effect” to create a dexterous manipulator, and the automatic dumping bucket will also lift the hopper under the pressure of swell.

Recommend

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *