Harry Harlow’s methods during his seminal research on maternal bonding were pretty excessive on the cruelty front, even back in the 50s when the experiments occurred.

The respected psychologist conducted a series of tests on infant monkeys. The hypothesis was: ‘Babies need a mother’s love’. Displaying the twisted logic of a super-villain, Harlow would take the subjects from their mothers and cage them in a sensory deprivation cage. The ‘pit of despair’, as Harlow called it, consisted of an inverted pyramid on the interior, with smooth sides to render it impossible for the baby monkey to climb, causing it to slip down to the cell floor. After a few days of frantic escape attempts, the monkey would give up and eventually just shut down. Four were left in the pit for a month, four for six months and four were left in there for a year. For a goddamned year!

Cruel Trivia: Harry Harlow’s Pit Of Despair and his Rape Rack
Cruel Trivia: Harry Harlow’s Pit Of Despair and his Rape Rack

The results were clear – these monkeys ranged from seriously disturbed to emotionally and physically destroyed – 2 even began refusing food and starved to death. When it became clear that the monkeys could no longer engage in sexual activity after their ordeal, Harlow fashioned another nifty invention that he pithily dubbed ‘The Rape Rack’. The female subjects were tied to it in a mating posture, allowing for males to mate with them.

Needless to say, these tortured monkeys didn’t make great mothers. One traumatised subject held her infant to the floor and chewed its feet off. So, what did we learn? Motherly love is important. And some humans are sick.

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AqcfPasegoabe
AqcfPasegoabe
3 months ago

I feel trembling all over the horrible rape case

KbbfCland
KbbfCland
2 months ago

American psychologist Harlow set out to study the behavior of rhesus monkeys when they were separated from their mothers. He wanted to determine how much mother’s contact and companionship helped young primates grow, both socially and psychologically.

Harlow conducted various experiments to observe how the attitudes and behaviors of monkeys were affected when they left their mothers and were placed in an isolated environment, and recorded their reactions.

AbcfPasegoabe
AbcfPasegoabe
3 months ago

“PETA will work hard to rescue the more than 300 experimental monkeys still in the laboratory, so that they can retire and live forever, and will continue to call on the human society to stop all primate experiments.”